Pomodoro

pomodoro

Good morning, dear friends! A note today that I’ll be trying something new on the blog for the next two weeks. I have a writing course that begins tomorrow and meets daily through Sept 23rd. In my quest for time management and increased productivity, I’m planning to use the Pomodoro Technique. In fact, I’m using it right now–the kitchen timer is ticking away. I’m going to limit my blog posts over the next two weeks to 25 minutes of writing per post. Mind you, I’m practicing Pomodoro-with-toddler, and the scant minutes have already been interrupted by an apple request, a diaper change, and TV switched to Sarah & Duck (terrific show, by the way).

I’m trying to up my game here, truly eliminate distraction and stay on task (or keep the distraction limited to toddler interruptions and not my own distracted brain, email, text, social media, etc etc). More typos, grammatical errors, and redundancies are likely–forgive me. Also, less photos.

So, any Pomodoro people out there? Below is a how-to for anyone who’s interested!

HOW IT WORKS:
The fundamentals of the Pomodoro Technique are simple yet incredibly effective.
1. CHOOSE A TASK YOU’D LIKE TO GET DONE:

Something big, something small, something you’ve been putting off for a million years: it doesn’t matter. What matters is that it’s something that deserves your full, undivided attention.
2. SET THE POMODORO FOR 25 MINUTES:

Make a small oath to yourself: I will spend 25 minutes on this task and I will not interrupt myself. You can do it! After all, it’s just 25 minutes.
3. WORK ON THE TASK UNTIL THE POMODORO RINGS

Immerse yourself in the task for the next 25 minutes. If you suddenly realize you have something else you need to do, write the task down on a sheet of paper.
4. WHEN THE POMODORO RINGS, PUT A CHECKMARK ON A PAPER

Congratulations! You’ve spent an entire, interruption-less Pomodoro on a task.
5. TAKE A SHORT BREAK

Breathe, meditate, grab a cup of coffee, go for a short walk or do something else relaxing (i.e., not work-related). Your brain will thank you later.
6. EVERY 4 POMODOROS, TAKE A LONGER BREAK

Once you’ve completed four pomodoros, you can take a longer break. 20 minutes is good. Or 30. Your brain will use this time to assimilate new information and rest before the next round of Pomodoros.

(Post 236 of 365)

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3 thoughts on “Pomodoro

    • This structure is interesting, isn’t it? I’ve been using the timer on my phone, and it’s been helping me harness the minutes. I’m only a few days in, but so far, so good. Let me know how it goes today!

      Like

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